banner

Dear Miss Heacock:
I will try to write you a few lines so as to let you know how I am getting along and how I like my new home. I am doing right well for my beginning, but there is a time coming when I can do better. I like my home very well, only for one thing, but that I would not like to tell in this letter. I can milk right good now. Some things what Miss Malinda toll me I see is coming true, I can see that plain. I supposed you had been thinking something had happened to me because I didn’t write sooner. The reason I didn’t write, because Mrs. Brenaman didn’t have the things ready for me to write with. To-day Mr. Harry has been very sick and has not been able to work. I sometime go to town with Mrs. Brenaman. We have got a very large farm; it is one of the larger farms round hear. Susan, who is Mrs. Hall’s servant girl, came and got some blackberries out of our orchard yesterday evening. I can’t think of anymore to say just now, so I will close my letter.
One of yours forever,

Give my love to all, especially to Miss Malinda and tell her I will write to her sometime.
Please to excuse me putting this in the wrong place.

Dear Miss Heacock:
I enjoyed my ride very much. Wednesday about twelve o’clock Miss Rachel took Isabella and me and went up to Miss Clara’s house, and then Miss Clara took care of Isabella till Miss Wilson came.
When I reached my home Miss Emma was glad to see me and I was glad too, for I felt tired and sick. Miss Emma said sometime she would take me to see Isabella. I will bring my letter to a close. Give my love to everybody, and my best love to you.


Yours Truly,

Dear Miss Heacock:
I received your letter of August 25th. I like my new home very much. We have plenty of sweet potatoes this year. We made 100-10 bushels of oats. We have hogs, chickens, cows, horses. We have had plenty of peaches, apples, plums, pears and a plenty of cider to drink and to turn to vinegar. Have you heard of Dora, and of Carry since I left the Home?


Your Friend,

Dear Miss Heacock:
I will write you a few lines to let you know how I am getting along. Mr. and Mrs. Brennaman have changed my name to William, because one of his son’s name is Edward. We have three horses and 4 colts and one calf. We have cut our wheat, and Tuesday we will thrash it. We have seven cows and some pigs. Mr. Brennaman says after he has thrashed the wheat he will build a new kitchen. I wash every three meals. James Higgins has been over to see me twice. Walter Berry lives near James. We have raspberries, cabbage, celery, beets, onions. We have a whole field of tomatoes and corn. We have a peach orchard and some apples. I reached home safe. He has three sons, Mr. Harry and Mr. Edward and Bert. Give my love to all the ladies and to the children, especially to Mary. Now I will close my letter as it is bedtime. I will write soon.

Yours affectionately,

Dear Miss Heacock:
I received your letter and was very glad to hear from you and the boy. Soon after I came here, Mrs. Willson took me to Caroline to see Isabella and Lottie. They both have nice homes. On the 4th of July we went out to Mr. Willson and had skyrockets fired, which looked very pretty. Please tell brother I am very sorry I didn’t answer his letter sooner and I will try and answer it sometime. I ride horse-back after the cows. I wash the cow’s tits and sometimes I help Mr. Willson milk.

Please give my love to Miss Storum, Miss Hunter and Plummer.

Yours Truly,

Dear Miss Heacock:
I intended to write to you Sunday, but did not do it so I will do it now. I enjoy the country better than I do Washington. Please to write and tell me where I was born, for I would like to know, because it is a great thing to know. I feed the cow, pigs and the horse. I am knitting myself a pair of stockings for myself to wear this winter. She has made me a suit for Sunday. When will the boys commence going after blackberries. I was homesick; now I am all over it. The air out here is grand. We have been having good weather out here every time I been out here.

I forgot to put the date of the month at the heading of my letter, so I put it now, July 6th, 1891. Give my love to Uncle John, Miss Briggs, Aunt Mary, Malinda, Maria Marks, Mr. Bruce, Miss Storum, and all the wash-woman too, Frank Gordon, Garfield, Frank Seymour, James Mitchell, David Wesley, and your sister. I will bring my letter to a close.

Respectfully yours,

Dear Matron:
George is learning to do his work of feeding cows, pigs, &c., quite fast. I think he will be quite a smart fellow. He was very homesick at first. Whenever I mentioned your name or your sister, he would cry; but he is feeling better and more contented. As ever,

Yours true,

P.S. – George cried while writing this letter to you.

Dear Miss Heacock:
I received your letter. I was glad to here from home and that you are well and all children are to. I am pleased with my home and I am glad you got me a nice home. I am eating apple and peaches from morning till night. Miss Bettie carried me away some time she did. The day the Miss Bettie went down to the fish dinner I went to, and we all had pleasant time. I must now close my letter.

Yours truly,

I see William Gordon every day and William Diggs most every day, and my love to school boys, and let one the boys write to me, tell me about home.

Dear Miss Heacock:
I received your letter a few days ago and was very glad to hear from you and the children. Has Uncle John carried any of the boys after blackberries since the last time you wrote to me? This summer we have been drying apples and peaches. Miss Mary has also been canning fruit and making jelly and preserves. Friday Mr. Welsh had the ripest of his tobacco speared, and cutting the tops of some of his corn, and pulling fodder. Have you received a letter from any other of the boys and girls that left the home this summer? Has any of the children been to the public buildings this summer? Now, as I have nothing more to say, I will close my letter, hoping that in the future I will be able to write you a better letter. Please give my respect to all.

Yours truly,

footer